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The effects of boric acid-induced oxidative stress on antioxidant enzymes and survivorship in Galleria mellonella

Hyršl, Pavel | Büyükgüzel, Ender | Büyükgüzel, Kemal

Article | 2007 | Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology66 ( 1 ) , pp.23 - 31

Larvae of the wax moth, Galleria mellonella (L.), were reared from first instar on a diet supplemented with 156, 620, 1,250, or 2,500 ppm boric acid (BA). The content of malondialdehyde (MDA, an oxidative stress indicator), and activities of the antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)] were determined in the fat body and hemolymph in the 7th instar larvae and newly emerged pupae. Relative to control larvae, MDA was significantly increased in larval hemolymph, larval and pupal fat body, but decreased in the pupal hemolymph. Insects reared on di . . .ets with 156-and 620-ppm BA doses yielded increased SOD activity but 1,250- and 2,500-ppm doses resulted in decreased SOD activity in larval hemolymph. SOD activity was significantly increased but CAT was decreased in the larval fat body. High dietary BA treatments led to significantly decreased GST activity. However, they increased GPx activity in larval hemolymph. Dietary BA also affected larval survival. The 1,250- and 2,500-ppm concentrations led to significantly increased larval and pupal mortality and prolonged development. In contrast, the lowest BA concentration increased longevity and shortened development. We infer that BA toxicity is related, at least in part, to oxidative stress management. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc Daha fazlası Daha az

The influence of dietary alpha-solanine on the waxmoth galleria mellonellal

Büyükgüzel, Ender | Büyükgüzel, Kemal | Erdem, Meltem | Adamski, Zbigniew | Adamski, Zbigniew | Marciniak, Pawel | Ziemnicki, Kazimierz

Article | 2013 | Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology83 ( 1 ) , pp.15 - 24

Plant allelochemicals are nonnutritional chemicals that interfere with the biology of herbivores. We posed the hypothesis that ingestion of a glycoalkaloid allelochemical, ?-solanine, impairs biological parameters of greater wax moths Galleria mellonella. To test this idea, we reared wax moths on artificial diets with 0.015, 0.15, or 1.5 mg/100 g diet of ?-solanine. Addition of ?-solanine to the diet affected survival of seventh-instar larvae, pupae, and adults; and female fecundity and fertility. The diet containing the highest ?-solanine concentration led to decreased survivorship, fecundity, and fertility. The diets supplemented . . .with ?-solanine led to increased malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl contents in midgut and fat body and the effect was dose-dependent. Dietary ?-solanine led to increased midgut glutathione S-transferase activity and to decreased fat body glutathione S-transferase activitiy. We infer from these findings that ?-solanine influences life history parameters and antioxidative enzyme activities in the midgut and fat body of G. mellonella. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc Daha fazlası Daha az

Eicosanoids mediate cellular immune response and phenoloxidase reaction to viral infection in adult Pimpla turionellae

Büyükgüzel, Ender

Article | 2012 | Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology81 ( 1 ) , pp.20 - 33

Nodulation is the predominant insect cellular immune response to microbial infections. We posed the hypothesis that parasitoid insects in their adulthood express melanotic nodulation reactions to viral challenge and that eicosanoids mediate nodulation reactions and phenoloxidase (PO) activation in response to viral challenge. To test this idea, we injected Pimpla turionellae adults with indomethacin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, immediately prior to intrahemocoelic injection of Bovine herpes simplex virus-1 (BHSV-1). Treating newly emerged adults of P. turionellae with BHSV-1 induced nodulation reactions, and decreased PO . . .activity at high viral doses. Relative to vehicle-treated controls, indomethacin-treated adults produced significantly reduced numbers of nodules following viral infection (down from approximately 21 nodules per adult to less than six nodules per adult). In addition to injection treatments, increasing dietary indomethacin dosages (from 0.01% to 0.1%) were associated with decreasing nodulation (by six-fold) and PO (by about three-fold) reactions to BHSV-1 injection. Wasp adults orally fed with the lowest dietary indomethacin concentration (0.001%) expressed significantly increased PO activity (1.45 unit/min/mg protein) while nodulation reaction was not affected in response to viral challenge compared to control adults. We infer from these findings that cyclooxygenase (COX) products, at least prostaglandins, mediate nodulation response and PO action to viral infection in adults of these highly specialized insects. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc Daha fazlası Daha az

The effects of xanthotoxin on the biology and biochemistry of galleria mellonella L. (lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

Erdem, Meltem | Büyükgüzel, Ender

Article | 2015 | Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology89 ( 4 ) , pp.193 - 203

The effects of a dietary plant allelochemical, xanthotoxin (XA), on survivorship, development, male and female adult longevity, fecundity, and hatchability of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella L. were investigated. Oxidative stress indicators, the lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein oxidation products, protein carbonyl (PCO) contents, and activities of a detoxification enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity were determined in wax moth adults. The insect was reared from first-instar larvae on an artificial diets containing XA at 0.001, 0.005, or 0.1% to adult stage in laboratory conditions. . . .Relative to the controls, the diets containing XA concentrations led to decreased survivorship in seventh instar, pupal, and adult stages. Compared to control diet (77.7%), the highest dietary XA concentration decreased survivorship to adulthood to 11.0%. The highest XA concentration (0.1%) reduced female longevity from 10.4 to 5.7 days and decreased egg numbers from 95.0 to 33.5 and hatchability from 82.7 to 35.6%. The lowest XA concentration (0.001%) led to about a sixfold increase in MDA content. XA at high concentrations (0.005 and 0.1%) increased MDA (by threefold) and protein carbonyl (by twofold) contents decreased GST activity. The highest dietary XA concentration decreased GST activity from 0.28 ± 0.025 to 0.16 ± 0.005 µmol/mg protein/min. We infer from these findings that XA-induced oxidative stress led to decreased biological fitness. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc Daha fazlası Daha az

Ingestion of the anti-bacterial agent, gemifloxacin mesylate, leads to increased gst activity and peroxidation products in hemolymph of Galleria mellonella l. (lepidoptera: pyralidae)

Erdem, Meltem | Küçük, Ceyhun | Büyükgüzel, Ender | Büyükgüzel, Kemal

Article | 2016 | Archives of Insect Biochemistry and Physiology93 ( 4 ) , pp.202 - 209

Gemifloxacin mesylate (GEM) is a synthetic, fourth-generation fluoroquinolone antibacterial antibiotic that has a broad spectrum of activity against bacteria. GEM inhibits DNA synthesis by inhibiting DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activities. Recent research into insect nutrition and mass-rearing programs, in which antibiotics are incorporated into the culture media to maintain diet quality, raised a question of whether clinical antibiotics influence the health or biological performance of the insects that ingest these compounds. Because some antibiotics are pro-oxidant compounds, we addressed the question with experiments designed . . . to assess the effects of GEM (mesylate salt) on oxidative stress indicators, using Galleria mellonella larvae. The insects were reared from first-instar larvae to adulthood on artificial diets amended with GEM at 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, or 1.0%. Feeding on the 1% diets led to significantly increased hemolymph contents of the lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde and protein oxidation products, protein carbonyl. All GEM concentrations led to increased hemolymph glutathione S-transferase activity. We inferred that although it was not directly lethal to G. mellonella larvae, dietary exposure to GEM exerts measurable oxidative damage, possibly on insects generally. Long-term, multigenerational effects remain unknown. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc Daha fazlası Daha az

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